Join Cindy in Alsace!

are two typical Alsatian towns. The architecture, is fairytale, meets living history, with the added benefit of French dessert! There are little towns like these scattered all over Alsace, exploring, (note Jupiter near clock tower) and eating, here is a delightful way to spend your days! Cheers to you from beautiful Alsace~

via Ribeauville

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Un goût de Narbonne: deux

Due to a number of photos I wish to share, we are still in Narbonne. I do hope you find them worthwhile. Alas, I had to dodge a number of workmen, vehicles (yes, even in the park) scaffolding and a number of the earlier tourists. Yet here in the area, our tourists can be found in any season. Within another week or two, the crowds will swell in all these locations. 

Parc de ville
Parc de ville

The sun dial is directly behind Place de ville seen in part one. It is a small but lovely park with flowers, benches and oh what a view!

Have a seat and enjoy the view!
Have a seat and enjoy the view!
Parc de ville 2
Parc de ville 2
Parc de ville 3
Parc de ville 3
Tourist Office
Tourist Office

Turning left as you exit the park and a right turn onto the street ahead you will find the the haven for tourists with questions. In a city the size of Narbonne you will be welcomed in several languages and the latest in information offered. You might guess that the Canal de Robine is just behind the bureau.

 

Chocolat!
Chocolat!

Of the many shops lining the street, this one seemed to sweep me inside. I do hope you will understand?

Le gendarme
Le gendarme
The owl, fish,
The owl, fish, rabbits…

 

Le chef!
Le chef!
Le chateau!
Le chateau!

If you haven’t had your minimum daily requirements of chocolate, this may be the time… the aroma of chocolate permeates everything in the shop and I believe that I smelled it for awhile after parting.

and more chocolate!
and more chocolate!

While I’ve been to Holland and Belgium a few times and their chocolate is unbeatable. The Swiss and German chocolate is lovely but do not imagine that France’s chocolate cannot compete. For those, yes I am aware there are a few of you out there, that are not chocolate lovers we have something else that is very French.

*

Now I must admit to trying a few macarons in the eight+ years in France. Yet none have come even close to these delectable clouds of perfections! They should be sold with a warning that they are habit forming…

Les macarons
Les macarons

I do promise that the next post will be from a different location. However, if Narbonne is on your vacation list you won’t be disappointed and try to stay over for the market day, visit the museums just footsteps away for the square. 

Bisous,

Léa

 

Musée Lapidaire

Entrance to the museum
Entrance to the museum

The museum houses a grand collection of Roman Stones which were found in and around the area of Narbonne and offered on display in the former church, Notre Dame de Lamourguier, the remains of a 13th-century Benedictine Monastery.  It is a fine example of Southern Gothic art. There are over 1300 blocks of carved stone on display and constitutes one of the largest collections in Europe. Many of the stones were recovered from Roman grave sites and incorporated into the old ramparts of the city for decorative purposes. When the old ramparts were dismantled in the 19th-century, the stones were relocated to their current place of exhibition.

Make sure to click on the photos as it will make the carvings easier to view.

Bisous,

Léa

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Moulins



Located in Central France, Moulins is in the region of the Auvergne and is approximately 2.5 hours south of Paris. The towers of the Cathedral and Eglise du Sacre-Coeur dominate the skyline. The eglise is home to a Black Madonna and child statue in wood and is from the 15th century.

JEANNE D’ARC

Moulin grew up in the 10th century and takes its name from the many mills, which once lined the department (Allier).

Because Moulins was the capital of the duchy of Bourbonnais (c. 10th-16th century), and has noteworthy artistic and historic treasures. When I visited in 2006, the House of Bourbonn was wrapped in scaffolding and limited my photo options. I look forward to rectifying this and visiting this stunning city again. Naturally, I will post the next visit here.

While in Moulins, visit Grand Café. It has the notable first of having the first telephone and the first automobile in the area. The owner would proudly park his new motorcar outside and watch the tourists pour in.

Until the time of the French Revolution, Moulins served as capital for the province of Bourbonnais and the seat of the Dukes of Bourbon. Its existence can be documented as early as the year 990.

The town gained in prominence when Charles IV elevated Louis I de Clermont to Duke of Bourbon in 1327. Before establishing her career, the orphaned young Coco Chanel was educated here. Moulins was the birthplace of the great 19th century operatic baritone and art collector Jean-Baptiste Faure.

Bisous,

Léa