Châtaignes

Chestnuts roasting on an open fire!
Chestnuts roasting on an open fire!

Once again I am spirited back to the foyer in my little village. Tonights event is Châtaignes and a presentation. Fresh roasted Chestnuts. The evening was sponsored by the village association and for a fee, read fundraiser, of five euros, you had a presentation of restoration work and archeology on the village Château topped off with tables covered with hot, freshly roasted chestnuts, red and white wine and neighbours and friends. What more could one ask for?

As the presentation finished, tables quickly appeared and were covered with newspapers then large containers filled with Châtaignes right off the fire. Naturally bottles of wine were on the tables and magically your glass refilled.

Friends and new friends were gathered around the tables enjoying the spread and company! I had eaten chestnuts once back when living in New York City. However, they were burned, lukewarm and tasted as if they were stale but re-heated. After that, I

Family, friends and fun!
A table filled with goodness and shared with family and friends.                              

 

 

 

 

had no further interest in Chestnuts, that is until I moved to France. That first chestnut quickly surrendered its cracked and willing shell. Warm, soft and nutty deliciousness melted in my mouth. One was not enough and there was no need for dinner this evening.

Another word for Châtaignes, chestnuts, is Marron. As you travel around France you will see vendors selling crêpes. One of the menu options will be Marron and it is a spread made from the chestnut. It can be used on crêpes in pastries of even on plain toast and it is delicious.

Bisous,

Léa

 

Crème de Marron de a Ardeche – Chestnut Spread                                       

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Serge, french teacher, caught in the act!
Serge, french teacher, caught in the act!       

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As one box of chestnuts disappears, another box of hot ones magically takes its place. Naturally, there is plenty of wine to wash it all down with.
As one box of chestnuts disappears, another box of hot ones magically takes its place. Naturally, there is plenty of wine to wash it all down with.                              

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Plenty to eat at this table as well. Just so it doesn't get in the way of conversations. Of course there is movement between the tables as well.
Plenty to eat at this table as well. Just so it doesn’t get in the way of conversations. Of course there is movement between the tables as well.                                           

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Le Château de Durban
Le Château de Durban

 

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20 thoughts on “Châtaignes

  1. I had only tied chestnuts in New York City, until I moved to France – interesting to see all the chestnut-related products available here and I am also attending a Fete de la Chataigne today. Bonne Fete!

  2. Another lovely trip!

    I love chestnuts. When I was a child we had an open fire at home and my fatner was always in charge of the chestnut roating at xmas. And we have an open fire now and still do them. I like them better if someone peels
    them for me! Not because of my hands alrhough that is now an issue, but just because I do!! Lol

    Xxxxxx

    1. I would happily peel them for you. Most of these were in such a delicate shell they came out so easily! It would be a pleasure. I am glad you have such lovely memories.

    1. You are in for a treat. However, I never had them in California and it wasn’t until I had lived in NYC that I tried them. That was not so memorable but I thought it was only right to try again here and was well rewarded. Thanks for your kind comment. I do adore France, my village and most of all the people. I am so very fortunate to be here.

  3. My mother-in-law used to make chestnut dressing for her Christmas turkey. Yum. I tried chestnuts in Toronto once from a street vendor, but my experience was a lot like yours. Not yum!

    1. I’ve never had them in stuffing. Being on my own now, it is not likely that I shall be cooking another big bird! I have never seen a whole turkey in the market here but imagine they are available if wanted. Thanks for commenting!

  4. Hot chestnuts, wine, and friends – that does sound like a great combination. You keep tempting me to visit so don’t be too surprised if I show up on your doorstep someday. 🙂

    1. I do understand. In Spring 2006, I visited France for six weeks and was hooked. I went back to California, sold my house and that was it. For the first time, I am HOME! By the way, last night was fun as well but more on that later. 🙂

      Perhaps you can tell by my posts that I do love it here.

      1. Yes, I can tell. 🙂 That’s great that you had to courage to make such a huge change and that it all worked out so well.

      2. Thank you. There was absolutely no COURAGE involved. I simply came home where I belonged. While I realise that is difficult for most to understand, it is true.

    1. Your generosity in nominating me for an award is appreciated. However, your continued participation in either/both of my blogs is the award I value most. Merci beaucoup!

  5. I love chestnuts, lea. They’re also popular in Chinese stalls during Christmas holidays here in Manila. Well, I’d say they’re a favorite in most parts of the world, and has become the object for celebration.

    1. Actually, growing up in Southern California, I had only heard of them in books. While living in New York City, I did try them once and the results of that disaster were in the post. I’m glad you enjoyed it.

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